Final Draft
A Journal Entry on Oktoberfest
By: Jonathan Peterson

Dear Journal,
These past few weeks I have been in Munich, Germany at Oktoberfest. It was an amazing experience to learn about the event and all the
Munich, Germany
Munich, Germany
do's and don'ts of Oktoberfest. The first thing I did when I got off the plane was meet up with my guide. He took me back to my hotel but on the way we drove past the fair grounds of Oktoberfest and there were giant rides set up all over the 103 acre fairgrounds. My guide said that events at Oktoberfest have advanced over the years and now its pretty much a get together for all the people of Germany. I was wondering how it started when my guide told me, it's like he was inside my head. He said that the whole celebration started at the wedding of Crown Prince Ludwig (later King Ludwig I of Bavaria) and Princess Therese von Sachsen-Hildburghausen when they held a huge celebration near Munich. The meadow they had the party in is now named after the princess. The celebration was so exciting that people agreed to have it every year as a tradition and have had it every year since 1811, but some exceptions were made for war and disease. There have been 24 cancellations due to war and disease. At that moment we arrived at my hotel and my guide helped me unload my stuff and told me to get some rest for the ceremony tomorrow. I fell asleep minutes later because of the trip here and all of the information that I had just learned left me exhausted.
The Hotel I Stayed At
The Hotel I Stayed At


The days went by like a blur and since the first day of the celebration was unity day and a Sunday the festival is now 18 days long instead of 16. Oktoberfest got kicked off
when Munich's Oberbürgermeister (lord mayor) tapped the first beer keg and yelled the traditional O'zapft is! ("It's tapped!"). Then there were parades, in which some 7,000 performers -- groups in traditional costumes and historical uniforms, marching bands, riflemen, thoroughbred horses and other livestock, old-fashioned carriages, and numerous floats -- paraded through the streets of Munich's city center showcasing the diversity of local, regional, and national customs. There were concerts
An Oktoberfest Band
An Oktoberfest Band
too, in which 400 bands/musicians took place and played music throughout the celebration. Food, boy was there food! Tons and tons of food such as, pork, chicken, sausage, pretzels and much more. Then there was a lot of beer too. Marzen is what the Germans call it. It's darker and stronger than most beer and it contains up to 6% alcohol. My guide told me that the event attracts over 6 million people which consume over 1.5 million gallons of beer, over 200,000 pairs of pork and sausage and over 480,000 spit roasted chickens. My guide also told me that the event brings in over 450 million euros to the city. But after 18 days of non-stop eating, drinking and learning anybody would get tired. I hope to come back here next year especially because it's the 200th anniversary of Oktoberfest. For right now though, I'm fine with the memories of this year and maybe a nap.
Oktoberfest Food
Oktoberfest Food

Sincerely,
Jonathan Peterson







Rough Draft
A Journal Entry on Oktoberfest
By: Jonathan Peterson

Dear Journal,
These past few weeks I have been in Munich, Germany at Oktoberfest. It was an amazing experience to learn about the event and all the things that tie into it. I hired a personal guide that stayed with me the whole trip to show me around and tell me the do's and dont's of Oktoberfest. The first thing I did when I got off the plane was meet up with my guide. He took me back to my hotel but on the way we drove past the fair grounds of Oktoberfest and there were giant rides set up all over the 103 acre fairgrounds. My guide said that events at Oktoberfest have advanced over the years and now its just a get together for all the people of Germany. I was wondering how it started when my guide told me, it's like he was inside my head. He said that the whole celebration started at the wedding of
Crown Prince Ludwig (later King Ludwig I of Bavaria) and Princess Therese von Sachsen-Hildburghausen when they held a huge celebration near Munich. The meadow they had the party in is now named after the princess. The celebration was so exciting that people agreed to have it every year as a tradition and have had it every year since 1811, but some exceptions were made for war and disease. There have been 24 cancelations due to war and disease. At that moment we arived at my hotel and my guide helped me unload my stuff and told me to get some rest for the starting of the ceremony tomorrow. I fell asleep minutes later because of the trip here and all of the information that I had just learned left me exhausted.

The days went by like a blur. Oktoberfest got kicked off
when Munich's Oberbürgermeister (lord mayor) tapped the first beer keg and yelled the traditional O'zapft is! ("It's tapped!"). Then there were parades, in which some 7,000 performers -- groups in traditional costumes and historical uniforms, marching bands, riflemen, thoroughbred horses and other livestock, old-fashioned carriages, and numerous floats -- paraded through the streets of Munich's city center showcasing the diversity of local, regional, and national customs. There were concerts too, in which 400 bands/musicians took place and played music throughout the celebration. Food, boy was there food! Tons and tons of food such as, pork, chicken, sausage, pretzels and much more. Then there was a lot of beer too. Marzen is what the Germans call it. It's darker and stronger than most beer and it contains up to 6% alcohol. My guide told me that the event attracts over 6 million people which consume over 1.5 million gallons of beer, over 200,000 pairs of pork and sausage and over 480,000 spit roasted chickens. My guide also told me that the event brings in over 450 million euros to the city. But after a couple weeks of non-stop eating, drinking and learning anybody would get tired. I hope to come back here next year especially because it's the 200th anniversery of Oktoberfest. For right now though, I'm fine with the memories of this year and maybe a nap.

Sincerely,
Jonathan Peterson















NOTES:
http://german.about.com/library/blbraeuche_sep.htm

It may be called "Oktoberfest," but the big event starts in September.
It all began with a wedding—in October 1810. On the 12th day of October that year,Crown Prince Ludwig (later King Ludwig I of Bavaria) wed Princess Therese von Sachsen-Hildburghausen and held a big party near Munich (München).
so popular, that the party (complete with horse racing) took place again the following year, prompting the start of a traditional German celebration that has become world famous. Other than for interruptions caused by war or disease, Oktoberfest has been celebrated every year since 1811.
Begins each year on a Saturday in September and ends 16-18 days later (usually) on the first Sunday in October.Oktoberfest is extended if Unity Day falls after the first Sunday in October, making Oktoberfest vary from 16 to 18 days in length.Oktoberfest will celebrate its 200th anniversary in 2010.
With the exception of the obvious emphasis on beer, Oktoberfest is more like a huge American state fair, complete with fun rides, merry-go-rounds, carnival booths, food, entertainment and, of course, those 14 famous beer halls sponsored by Bavarian brewers such as Paulaner, Löwenbräu or Spaten.
In fact, in its early years, Oktoberfest was an agricultural fair. Nowadays, however, the Zentrallandwirtschaftsfest (ZLF) segment only takes place every four years (2004, 2008, 2012).
The large beer tents (actually large halls) didn't appear until 1896.
Back in the 1800s Munich was a smaller town than it is today, so Oktoberfest participants had to journey out to the Theresienwiese that now lies within the city.
The festivities get off at 12 noon on the Saturday that starts the event (am Wiesn-Samstag). This Oktoberfest tradition is relatively recent—it only began in 1950, when the then mayor, Thomas Wimmer, tapped the first keg.

http://www.vistawide.com/german/oktoberfest/oktoberfest.htm


Oktoberfest, the world's largest beer festival, is held annually in Munich, Germany
The 16-day party attracts over 6 million people every year who consume 1.5 million gallons of beer, 200,000 pairs of pork sausage, and 480,000 spit-roasted chickens during the two-week extravaganza
Oktoberfest is in fact one of Munich's largest and most profitable tourist attractions. It brings over 450 million euros to the city's coffers each year.The largest Oktoberfest held outside of Germany takes place each year in the twin cities of Kitchener-Waterloo in Canada, where a large ethnic German population resides.
The event still takes place on the "Theresienwiese" ("Theresa's meadow"), which was named after the new bride; to the locals, it's simply known as "Wies'n".
During the two weeks before the first Sunday in October, these fairgrounds are transformed into a city of beer tents, amusements, rides, performers, and booths of vendors peddling gastronomic delights and traditional confections.
The Costume and Riflemen's Procession takes place on the first Sunday of the festival,
The second Sunday of the Oktoberfest features an open-air big band concert involving the 400 or so musicians who comprise all of the Oktoberfest bands.
Between events and beer tents, guests can traverse the 103 acre Oktoberfest grounds to ride a Ferris wheel, roller coaster, or water slide, navigate their way through a labyrinth, visit a haunted house, be entertained by numerous types of performers, take a look at the flea circus, stop off at one of dozens of game booths, or take a festival tour, among other things.
Oktoberfest beer is of a variety called Märzen. Darker and stronger than traditional beer, Märzen contains up to 6% alcohol, is bottom-fermented, and is lagered for at least 30 days.
Before the advent of modern refrigeration techniques, this type of beer was brewed in March (as its name suggests) and allowed to age through the summer, so that it was ready to drink by late summer or early fall.
Like all German beer, the Oktoberfest beer is brewed according to strict German standards (called the Reinheitsgebot and in effect since 1516) that precisely define the four ingredients allowed in the brewing of beer: barley, hops, malt, and yeast.
Just 6 Munich breweries - Augustiner, Hacker-Pschorr, Hofbräu, Löwenbräu, Paulaner, and Spaten - are permitted to serve beer at the festival.
14 larger and several smaller beer tents and beer gardens provide enough seating for 98,000 visitors at a time.
Beer is served by the Maß, a one-liter mug, and costs about 8 euros. Beer maids and waiters must be able to carry 10 of these beer-filled mugs at a time.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oktoberfest


Originally these would have been dark lagers, but from 1872 a strong March brewed version of an amber-red Vienna lager made by Josef Sedlmayr became the favorite Oktoberfestbier.
The color of these lagers may range from pale gold to deep amber, with the darker colours more common in the USA.
Hop levels tend not to be distinctive, though some American examples may be firmly hopped.
Modern beers sold as Oktoberfest and Märzen in Europe tend not to be too differentiated from other pale lagers of this strength, while older German and American influenced examples will be fairly malty in flavour and inclined to use a range of malts, especially dark malts such as Vienna or Munich.[4[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oktoberfest#cite_note-3|]]]
In the year 1812, the Oktoberfest was cancelled since Bavaria was involved in the Napoleonic war.
In 1816, carnival booths appeared.
The main prizes were silver, porcelain, and jewellery.
In 1819, The founding citizens of Munich assumed responsibility over festival management. It was agreed that the Oktoberfest would be celebrated each and every year without exception.
To honour the marriage of King Ludwig I and Therese of Bavaria, a parade took place for the first time in 1835.
Since 1850, this has become a yearly event and an important component of the Oktoberfest.
8,000 people — mostly from Bavaria — in traditional costumes walk from Maximilian Street, through the centre of Munich, to the Oktoberfest. The march is led by the Münchner Kindl.
Since 1850, the statue of Bavaria has watched the Oktoberfest.
In 1853, the Bavarian Ruhmeshalle was finished.
In 1854, 3,000 residents of Munich succumbed to an epidemic of cholera, so the festival was cancelled.
Also, in the year 1866, there was no Oktoberfest as Bavaria fought in the Austro-Prussian War.
In 1870, the Franco-Prussian war was the reason for cancellation of the festival.
In 1873, the festival was once more cancelled due to a cholera epidemic.
In 1880, the electric light illuminated over 400 booths and tents.
In 1881, booths selling bratwursts opened.
Beer was first served in glass mugs in 1892.
At the end of the 19th century, a re-organization took place. Until then, there were games of skittles, large dance floors, and trees for climbing in the beer booths. They wanted more room for guests and musicians. The booths became beer halls.
From 1914 to 1918, World War I prevented the celebration of Oktoberfest. In 1919 and 1920, the two years after the war, Munich celebrated only an "Autumn Fest." In 1923 and 1924, the Oktoberfest was not held due to inflation.
In 1933, the Bavarian white and blue flag was replaced with the standard swastika flag. From 1939 to 1945, due to World War II, no Oktoberfest took place.
From 1946 to 1948, after the war, Munich once again celebrated only the "Autumn Fest." The sale of proper Oktoberfest beer was not permitted; the guests had to make do with beer that had an alcohol content under 2%.
Since its beginnings the Oktoberfest has thus been cancelled 24 times due to war, disease and other emergencies.